Posts Tagged ‘substances’

Puliu

• Monday, March 12th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'puliu'.

puliu

  • (v.) to salivate
  • (adj.) salivating
  • (n.) saliva, spit, spittle

A puliu palaki oi’ia i’i a!
“You’re dog’s slobbering on me!”

Notes: Today’s iku looks like a few others (e.g. huna), but somehow it means “salivate”. I think it’s the little line under the mouth… It kind of looks like that. Doesn’t it?

I remember creating a whole bunch of these “veiled face” iku (where “a whole bunch” could very well mean three). To me, they almost look too realistic for the system (which is odd, since they’re composed of straight lines and nothing more), but I’ve stuck with them. Might as well celebrate them, I guess.

Update: Oh! I just realized that the three lines above the mouth are there because they come from the iku for lelea, which means “water”. Ha! Kind of gross. ;)


Mi’e

• Saturday, March 10th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'mi'e'.

mi’e

  • (n.) yarn

Mi’e?! Li ia i mi’e i’i?!
“Yarn?! You get me yarn?!”

Notes: There was some highly specific reason I came up with a word for “yarn” in Kamakawi. It was something around about something at some time that led me to think, “I need a word for ‘yarn’ in Kamakawi!” I cannot for the life of me remember what that something may have been. I know nothing of the history of yarn, and honestly can’t think of a good reason for it to exist nowadays. Honestly, what do you do with yarn? Make hair for dolls? Use it in “art” projects in elementary school? What the heck is it good for?!

So Kamakawi’s got a word for “yarn”. Hooray. Even has it’s own iku. And it’s not like it’s an ikunoala, or anything: That’s an ikuiku that looks like a spool of yarn. What on Earth was I thinking…


Fava

• Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fava'.

fava

  • (n.) dust
  • (adj.) dusty
  • (v.) to be dusty

A fava heka.
“The air is dusty.”

Notes: This is another one os those iku that I’m sure I had a good reason for, but whose raison d’être I can’t, at the moment, remember. It looks like it might have fa in there on top, but I can’t explain the extra lines. As for the “ground” determinative, that’s as it should be (or at least it makes sense to me [it’s below the dust, see]). I’m sure the etymology will come to me some day.


Noto

• Friday, February 17th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'noto'.

noto

  • (v.) to be shady
  • (adj.) shady, shade-giving
  • (n.) shade
  • (v.) to be cool (coll.)
  • (adj.) cool, awesome

Au noto kaneko!
“Cats are cool!”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!! :D

Here’s a picture of Keli greeting Erin’s fingertip:

Keli getting touched on the nose.

Today’s word means “shady”, but is used to mean “cool” by Kamakawi youth. I thought it was a pretty cool word for cool. I’d try to start using it in English, but I think it would give the wrong impression.


Eta

• Thursday, February 16th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'eta'.

eta

  • (n.) fat (of an animal)
  • (v.) to have lots of fat
  • (adj.) having lots of fat, fatty (in the corporeal sense)

Oku meimei nukoa oku: eta kupae.
“There’s no meat left: only fat.”

Notes: Today’s word refers only to the substance “fat”; it’s not a descriptive adjective.

Describing this iku as an ikuleyaka is a bit convenient… It’s clear that the iku is based on the iku for nukoa, “meat”; what isn’t clear is what’s going on underneath. What it looks like to me is that the meat is roasting on a spit, and the fat is dripping off (hence the three lines, instead of the one). I’m not sure if this is what I intended, though, so calling it an ikuleyaka seems like a safe way to characterize the difference between it and nukoa.

Also, if you’d like to go back in time, now you can see how feta was built off of this iku. :D


Nivu

• Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'nivu'.

nivu

  • (v.) to drink
  • (adj.) drinking
  • (n.) liquid (archaic)

Oku nivu ei i ipe tou! Ae kavakava lona!
“I can’t drink that! It’s too hot!”

Notes: I’m listening to “Flashdance… What a Feeling” by Irene Cara right now. That means things are awesome. What a song; what a movie.

The iku for nivu is a combination of ni and fu, though it might not look like it at first. The spearhead on the bottom of the stick of ni is ordinarily something you’d expect of la were a part of the word, but it’s used here (in combination with the impromptu open square) to make the fu face of fu.

Common word, this one. It’s a wonder I haven’t really used it here…


Leti

• Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'leti'.

leti

  • (v.) to be rusty, to be rust-covered
  • (adj.) rusty, rusted, rust-covered

Leti ei!
“I’m rusty!”

Notes: Heh, heh. That’s a little play on a song from The Venture Bros.

Today’s word is an instantiation of a very old (and no longer productive) pattern. The word derives directly from late, the word for “rust”, and the iku also derives from the iku for late. Basically, a few lines have been added, making it look like this poor, upside-down metal bird is shining with rustiness. Ha. Love it.


Late

• Monday, February 6th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'late'.

late

  • (v.) to rust
  • (n.) rust
  • (n.) rusting

Late ia, he Paleti! Late!
“Rust, Brady! Rust!”

Notes: Well, it wasn’t a great game, but it was a pretty good game—and it had the right outcome! There were a couple of outstanding plays and it was a close game the whole way, but in the end, the Patriots fell to the Giants: 21-17. Nothing makes me happier than to see Tom Brady and Bill Belichick suffer.

Today’s word isn’t related at all to the word for “metal” (moka), but the iku is. Check it out. Late, which means “rust”, is the iku for moka turned on its head (to indicate that something bad has happened to it). As metal in its natural state isn’t rusty, rusted metal is the “bad” version of it—hence, the iku.


Leke

• Sunday, February 5th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'leke'.

leke

  • (n.) olona, hemp (used to make fabric, rope, etc.)
  • (adj.) made from olona

Li ia i ipe levu leke e nevi i’i.
“Give me that olona rag.”

Notes: This is, basically, hemp that’s used to make stuff. I always get a kick out of this iku, though. I call it “Old Tooth-Head”. Also kind of reminds me of those things that pump oil. When I was a kid, I would call them army ants.

I’ve made my piece with the Patriots winning this Super Bowl. I’m prepared to approach with a zen-like calm. Instead, I will focus my attention on replays of the Puppy Bowl. Nothing warms the heart (or the feet, come to think of it) more than adorable puppies. I shall think on them while enduring an awful Patriots victory.


Teka

• Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'teka'.

teka

  • (n.) (sea) salt

Li ia ie teka livu e nevi i’i.
“Pass me the salt.”

Notes: There’s no polite version of “give” here, so nevi serves. (Wait a minute! I’ve never done nevi?! Man oh man!) Salt will come most naturally from the sea to island-dwellers, so the type of salt this refers to is sea salt. It’s been extended to salt that comes from other sources (they both do the trick), but the sea is its true origin.


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