Posts Tagged ‘sea’

Hule

• Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'hule'.

hule

  • (n.) o’opu naniha

Iwe levea ti hule.
“The water is full of o’opu naniha.”

Notes: The o’opu naniha is a very small little fish endemic to Hawai‘i, and it has a little cousin that swims the waters of the Kamakawi Islands. They’re nice fish, as far as little fish go.

Believe it or not, this iku is an ikunoala: a kind of blend of hu and le. Unlike most ikunoala, it’s not really built off any one iku. Instead, the two just kind of morphed together over the years. And now we have what we have here.

It seems to me that this would be a great, iconic name for a baseball team. You know how some baseball teams end up with these names that don’t seem fierce at all (the Cubs, the Mudhens, etc.)? I can see a team called the Hule in the Kamakawi baseball league. (Of course, they probably wouldn’t have a league of their own. They’d probably be a part of a main land minor league and have an irregular schedule due to the distance. But that’s another story…)

Update: No Kamakawi Word of the Day tomorrow—but this time not because I’m lazy! Tomorrow I’ll be going off the internet in protest of SOPA. Hope your Wednesday is a happy one.

Edit: LOL Isn’t that just like me? I scheduled the post specifically so it would avoid the whole SOPA protest. I kept on thinking, “Okay, schedule it for the next day”, and so I moved it one day ahead. Unfortunately, the day I moved it ahead of was…yesterday, the 17th (which, at the time, was “today”). So…yeah. Oops!


Teka

• Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'teka'.

teka

  • (n.) (sea) salt

Li ia ie teka livu e nevi i’i.
“Pass me the salt.”

Notes: There’s no polite version of “give” here, so nevi serves. (Wait a minute! I’ve never done nevi?! Man oh man!) Salt will come most naturally from the sea to island-dwellers, so the type of salt this refers to is sea salt. It’s been extended to salt that comes from other sources (they both do the trick), but the sea is its true origin.


Muto

• Monday, December 19th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'muto'.

muto

  • (n.) silversides

Au mawa muto u takoikoi i kawi.
“The silversides swim and look like a cloud.”

Notes: Silversides are small little fish that are shiny on their sides (hence the name). They look like little minnows or grunions. Oh! Ha. Wouldn’t you know it? Grunions are a type of silversides. Shiver me timbers! Anyway, they’re shiny little fishes with a silver streak going across their side (actually I just think it’s their spine you can see through their little bodies). They’re wonderful sports. They swim in great big packs, and give the ocean charm.

Coincidentally, the iku for muto kind of looks like a stylized silversides. Rather fat for a silversides, but the little midline of mu kind of looks like the spine-line you can see on a silversides or grunion.


Mono

• Sunday, December 18th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'mono'.

mono

  • (n.) canoe
  • (v.) to go by canoe

A male mono ei poiu a…
“And now I’m going to canoe away…”

Notes: Something like, “And now I’m taking my ball and going home.” It’s the first week of the fantasy football playoffs, and I’m not in them. I finished with a 7-7 record, behind even the terrible division winner who finished with an 8-6 record. Total bummer. On the other hand, in my friend’s league, which I’ve been helping out in, we finished with a 12-1-1 record and got a bye in the first round in a three tier playoff system. We’ve been relying on the Jets’ defense, but picked up the Broncos’ D at the last minute, so I think we should be good.

Today’s iku is another that’s based off mo, which is one of my favorites. All the iku based off mo turned out to be pretty good, in my opinion (that one and nu). And to me, it kind of looks like a canoe (or somehow the triangle reminds me of rowing a canoe). If I ever have a canoe, I’ll probably paint this on there. Or on an oar. Maybe both…


Luti

• Monday, December 12th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'luti'.

luti

  • (n.) box crab

I luti pe!
“There’s a box crab there!”

Notes: Not much time to do a real post today, so here’s the word for box crab! Box crabs are bizarre looking creatures. Take a look at one here (though a Google image search will probably serve you better). I remember seeing these as a kid at the old Cabrillo Park Aquarium. I’ve always been a big fan of crabs. :)


Lako

• Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'lako'.

lako

  • (n.) hook
  • (adj.) hooked, having a hook
  • (v.) to catch with a hook, to fish

Li lako i ia ko…
“The hook brings you back…”

Notes: And this one’s a quote from the Blues Traveler song “The Hook”. It’s a fun one.

The iku for lako is based on the iku for iloa, which means “shoulder”. It’s basically the same, but it has a little notch on the right side (make it look more hook-like). Real Kamakawi hooks aren’t so angular, but it does the job.


A’iki

• Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'a'iki'.

a’iki

  • (n.) coral reef

I a’iki kavi pe.
“There’s a large coral reef there.”

Notes: A’iki is certainly an older word, and its iku is one of those that defies exact description. It’s, of course, built off the iku for “white”, a’i, but there’s no etymological relationship between the two. It features the “ground” determinative (used with places and locations), and it also kind of looks like a coral reef, but that could just be me. So it might’ve been an ikuleyaka, but usually those don’t have any phonological component.

Hey, apropos of nothing, if you want to see something good, check out the latest series at the Kēlen Word of the Day blog. Sylvia’s translated “The Jabberwocky” into Kēlen and is discussing the translation line by line. I never thought of the “slithy toves” as lizard, but that’s part of the fun!


Nupa

• Sunday, November 6th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'nupa'.

nupa

  • (n.) triggerfish

Ka ni’u nupa i’i!
“The triggerfish bit me!”

Notes: The triggerfish is quite the curious fish. Check it out here (nice pictures!). I’ve never swum about with triggerfish, but I imagine if I did, I’d try to give them their space.

By the way, I think this would be a cool crest—and nickname—for a soccer team. For colors, I’m imagining white, gray, gold, black with teal accents. Hmmm… Maybe I’ll have to try to create some uniforms… I think that would be a productive use of my time. ;)


Ilo

• Thursday, October 27th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'ilo'.

ilo

  • (n.) oar (of a boat)

Au utu ilo o eneta.
“The oars of the ship are broken.”

Notes: Yesterday’s word was iloa, which is right next to today’s word alphabetically, so I thought I’d throw it up. Nothing special about oars, I suppose—or this iku. The iku comprises a pair of oars. For boats. And rowing. Hooray! :D

The iku itself is still pretty simple (just four strokes), so I figure it works out well enough. By the way, for those who have never tried to row a small boat or canoe: not as easy as it looks! I was surprised. Also, it looks completely automatic, the rowing motion. It’s not. That’s something you’ve got to work at. Good workout, though.


Foka

• Friday, October 21st, 2011

Glyph of the word 'foka'.

foka

  • (n.) fish (or any animal that lives primarily in the sea)

I ilea! Ai foka toi li’ia ai?
“Hello! Got any fish on you?”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!! :D

This is my second time around writing this post, thanks to the DreamHost outage yesterday (IT ATE MAH POST!11!!). Here’s Keli, twisting up the way she does when she wants to get comfy:

Keli contorting.

As I explained yesterday, I believe Keli now knows when she’s being photographed, and relishes it. The second I unbutton my little iPhone camera case, she perks up—will wake up if she was previously asleep, even (I can’t get pictures of her asleep anymore!). And then she poses and looks straight at the camera. What a cat!

Today’s word was inspired by the Spanish word “marisco”. We often see it pluralized (“mariscos”), where it means “seafood”. I liked the idea of having a single word refer to everything that comes out of the sea. The difference with foka is that it doesn’t refer primarily to food the way “mariscos” and certainly “seafood” does.


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