Posts Tagged ‘natural’

Puliu

• Monday, March 12th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'puliu'.

puliu

  • (v.) to salivate
  • (adj.) salivating
  • (n.) saliva, spit, spittle

A puliu palaki oi’ia i’i a!
“You’re dog’s slobbering on me!”

Notes: Today’s iku looks like a few others (e.g. huna), but somehow it means “salivate”. I think it’s the little line under the mouth… It kind of looks like that. Doesn’t it?

I remember creating a whole bunch of these “veiled face” iku (where “a whole bunch” could very well mean three). To me, they almost look too realistic for the system (which is odd, since they’re composed of straight lines and nothing more), but I’ve stuck with them. Might as well celebrate them, I guess.

Update: Oh! I just realized that the three lines above the mouth are there because they come from the iku for lelea, which means “water”. Ha! Kind of gross. ;)


Fate

• Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fate'.

fate

  • (n.) hole, gap
  • (v.) to put a hole in (something), to punch a hole
  • (adj.) full of holes
  • (n.) window

Ka lalau nea i amo poiu fate.
“She threw it out the window.”

Notes: Today’s iku featured in a word from a while back. If you go back and take a look at that entry, the etymology of the word should now be clear.

Fate’s glyph is a pretty simple ikunoala built off of te with a little fa on the inside.


Fava

• Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fava'.

fava

  • (n.) dust
  • (adj.) dusty
  • (v.) to be dusty

A fava heka.
“The air is dusty.”

Notes: This is another one os those iku that I’m sure I had a good reason for, but whose raison d’être I can’t, at the moment, remember. It looks like it might have fa in there on top, but I can’t explain the extra lines. As for the “ground” determinative, that’s as it should be (or at least it makes sense to me [it’s below the dust, see]). I’m sure the etymology will come to me some day.


Fewa

• Monday, March 5th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fewa'.

fewa

  • (n.) the non-white part of the eye (pupil and iris)

Au ele fewa o lea takeke leveya.
“His eyes are blue like the sea.”

Notes: In Kamakawi, you refer to the fewa’s color specifically, not just the eye (which is mata).

Today’s iku is, of course, the iku for i. As it looks like an eye from the side, the “identity” determinative is put beneath it for the word fewa.


Holi

• Sunday, February 19th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'holi'.

holi

  • (n.) sugar cane

A katava ia takeke holi!
“You’re as tall as a sugar cane!”

Notes: Today’s word is also a fairly simple ikunoala composed of ho with the leg forming the little hand of li. It doesn’t look anything like a sugar cane, though. Kind of looks like a dude with a hand growing out of his foot. Heh, heh…


Eta

• Thursday, February 16th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'eta'.

eta

  • (n.) fat (of an animal)
  • (v.) to have lots of fat
  • (adj.) having lots of fat, fatty (in the corporeal sense)

Oku meimei nukoa oku: eta kupae.
“There’s no meat left: only fat.”

Notes: Today’s word refers only to the substance “fat”; it’s not a descriptive adjective.

Describing this iku as an ikuleyaka is a bit convenient… It’s clear that the iku is based on the iku for nukoa, “meat”; what isn’t clear is what’s going on underneath. What it looks like to me is that the meat is roasting on a spit, and the fat is dripping off (hence the three lines, instead of the one). I’m not sure if this is what I intended, though, so calling it an ikuleyaka seems like a safe way to characterize the difference between it and nukoa.

Also, if you’d like to go back in time, now you can see how feta was built off of this iku. :D


Hu’e

• Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'hu'e'.

hu’e

  • (n.) geranium

Au nina hu’e li’i.
“My geraniums smell lovely.”

Notes: Kind of a…bizarre sentence…

I do like geraniums. The problem is I don’t like the word “geranium” in English (sounds ugly to me). I actually don’t much care for the word in Kamakawi, either. Huh. Really, though, the flowers aren’t all that bad. I mean, they’re all right. They’re flowery; have a pleasant smell. I’d like to have geraniums, I think. I just wouldn’t refer to them by name. I’d call them “those flowers out front”, or something similar.


Kaiwea

• Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'kaiwea'.

kaiwea

  • (n.) stork

Lea i kaiwea! Ua hale ei…
“He’s a stork! I think…”

Notes: HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY!!! :D

Today I got quite a surprise. Erin said she had a present for me, and I descended the stairs to see this fabulous gentleman:

My new bird statue.

Isn’t he outstanding?! I don’t know if it’s supposed to be a stork or a flamingo or some other type of bird, but I decided his name should be Kaiwea—and that has given birth to a new Kamakawi word. Storks, you see, are ubiquitous, and I’m rather surprised I didn’t have a word for it yet. Well, now I do! And it also allowed me to use the iku for le’o as a determinative, which is something I haven’t yet done.

Today is a good day! :D


Feta

• Monday, February 13th, 2012

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Glyph of the word 'feta'.

feta

  • (v.) to be quiet
  • (adj.) quiet
  • (n.) quietness

Feta ia! A olo ei a.
“Quiet! I am sleeping.”

Notes: This is a translation of the first lines of a favorite Smashing Pumpkins’ song of mine.

And now for a real treat. I’d eschewed interlinears on this blog (and others) because they simply don’t format correctly. Well, thanks to Carsten Becker (creator of Ayeri), we now have a WordPress plugin that does it for us! :D I found this extremely exciting. Here it is in action:

Feta
[ˈfɛ.ɾə
/be quiet
ia!
ˈi.ə
2SG
A
a
NS
olo
ˈɔ.lɔ
sleep
ei
ˈe.i
1SG
a.
a]
PRG/

“Quiet! I am sleeping.”

How about that?! Not bad! :D Basically what it does is it lines up the first word of each line; the second word of each line; the third, etc. This way you can see how each one is glossed. I totally love it! I’m still messing around with the settings, so this may look different if you look at it a few hours from now, but I couldn’t be more pleased with the way this works!

As for today’s word, the iku may look a bit familiar…or would if I’d done that word yet. Dang! Could’ve sworn I’d done that word. Well. When I do do that word, you’ll see why this iku gets classified as both an iku’ume and an ikunoala.


Fune

• Sunday, February 12th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fune'.

fune

  • (n.) pipiwai (Hawaiian)

Iwe ha ti fune.
“The river is full of pipiwai.”

Notes: The pipiwai is a little shellfish that dwells in rivers. As I have never eaten one, I don’t know if they’re good for eating, and can’t, at this time, recommend them.

The glyph for fune is a combination of fu and ne. It’s always looked a little crowded to me… Eh. It adds flavor.


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