Posts Tagged ‘basic’

Noto

• Friday, February 17th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'noto'.

noto

  • (v.) to be shady
  • (adj.) shady, shade-giving
  • (n.) shade
  • (v.) to be cool (coll.)
  • (adj.) cool, awesome

Au noto kaneko!
“Cats are cool!”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!! :D

Here’s a picture of Keli greeting Erin’s fingertip:

Keli getting touched on the nose.

Today’s word means “shady”, but is used to mean “cool” by Kamakawi youth. I thought it was a pretty cool word for cool. I’d try to start using it in English, but I think it would give the wrong impression.


Eta

• Thursday, February 16th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'eta'.

eta

  • (n.) fat (of an animal)
  • (v.) to have lots of fat
  • (adj.) having lots of fat, fatty (in the corporeal sense)

Oku meimei nukoa oku: eta kupae.
“There’s no meat left: only fat.”

Notes: Today’s word refers only to the substance “fat”; it’s not a descriptive adjective.

Describing this iku as an ikuleyaka is a bit convenient… It’s clear that the iku is based on the iku for nukoa, “meat”; what isn’t clear is what’s going on underneath. What it looks like to me is that the meat is roasting on a spit, and the fat is dripping off (hence the three lines, instead of the one). I’m not sure if this is what I intended, though, so calling it an ikuleyaka seems like a safe way to characterize the difference between it and nukoa.

Also, if you’d like to go back in time, now you can see how feta was built off of this iku. :D


Hu’e

• Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'hu'e'.

hu’e

  • (n.) geranium

Au nina hu’e li’i.
“My geraniums smell lovely.”

Notes: Kind of a…bizarre sentence…

I do like geraniums. The problem is I don’t like the word “geranium” in English (sounds ugly to me). I actually don’t much care for the word in Kamakawi, either. Huh. Really, though, the flowers aren’t all that bad. I mean, they’re all right. They’re flowery; have a pleasant smell. I’d like to have geraniums, I think. I just wouldn’t refer to them by name. I’d call them “those flowers out front”, or something similar.


Feta

• Monday, February 13th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'feta'.

feta

  • (v.) to be quiet
  • (adj.) quiet
  • (n.) quietness

Feta ia! A olo ei a.
“Quiet! I am sleeping.”

Notes: This is a translation of the first lines of a favorite Smashing Pumpkins’ song of mine.

And now for a real treat. I’d eschewed interlinears on this blog (and others) because they simply don’t format correctly. Well, thanks to Carsten Becker (creator of Ayeri), we now have a WordPress plugin that does it for us! :D I found this extremely exciting. Here it is in action:

Feta
[ˈfɛ.ɾə
/be quiet
ia!
ˈi.ə
2SG
A
a
NS
olo
ˈɔ.lɔ
sleep
ei
ˈe.i
1SG
a.
a]
PRG/

“Quiet! I am sleeping.”

How about that?! Not bad! :D Basically what it does is it lines up the first word of each line; the second word of each line; the third, etc. This way you can see how each one is glossed. I totally love it! I’m still messing around with the settings, so this may look different if you look at it a few hours from now, but I couldn’t be more pleased with the way this works!

As for today’s word, the iku may look a bit familiar…or would if I’d done that word yet. Dang! Could’ve sworn I’d done that word. Well. When I do do that word, you’ll see why this iku gets classified as both an iku’ume and an ikunoala.


Oli

• Saturday, February 11th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'oli'.

oli

  • (n.) fruit
  • (v.) to pick (fruit, nuts, etc.), to harvest
  • (adj.) picked, harvested

Ai ipe i oli ai?
“Is that fruit?”

Notes: Fruit sounds good right now. I may have to go and harvest me some.

So this iku is a bit of a mystery. It doesn’t contain either o or li, and it doesn’t really look like an ikuiku. (What do you think? Does that look like a piece of fruit?) My first idea, on looking at it again, was that it kind of looked like a harvested field, but that doesn’t seem likely.

No, I think I may have intended this to be some sort of bizarre iconic representation of the category “fruit”. I’d say it looked like a coconut, but this is what a coconut looks like to the Kamakawi. Yes, I have to say that this one is a true mystery. We may never know what it’s supposed to represent…

Well, aside from the word oli.


Hawe

• Thursday, February 9th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'hawe'.

hawe

  • (n.) wishbone

Male i imi i ape o eya: hawe.
“There’ll be good luck for one of us: wishbone.”

Notes: I intended to link to the song I’m quoting above (“Wishbone” by Eleni Mandell), but it’s not on YouTube. This is insane. Eleni Mandell is probably the best thing to happen to LA music since Guns N’ Roses (not that the two sound anything alike), and no one seems to have noticed. Ticks me right off.

So forget today’s iku (which may look familiar): I command you to go to listen to some Eleni Mandell. One of my favorite songs from her early stuff is up (“Meant to Be in Love”), in addition to one of the standouts from my favorite album of hers, Snakebite. Many will have heard her cover of “I Love Paris” that was featured on a Carl’s Jr. commercial, but this one should have been equally as popular (from the same era). From her most recent album, this song is my absolute favorite—and easily one of the best she’s ever done.

I swear. People be crazy sometimes.


Nivu

• Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'nivu'.

nivu

  • (v.) to drink
  • (adj.) drinking
  • (n.) liquid (archaic)

Oku nivu ei i ipe tou! Ae kavakava lona!
“I can’t drink that! It’s too hot!”

Notes: I’m listening to “Flashdance… What a Feeling” by Irene Cara right now. That means things are awesome. What a song; what a movie.

The iku for nivu is a combination of ni and fu, though it might not look like it at first. The spearhead on the bottom of the stick of ni is ordinarily something you’d expect of la were a part of the word, but it’s used here (in combination with the impromptu open square) to make the fu face of fu.

Common word, this one. It’s a wonder I haven’t really used it here…


Nina

• Saturday, February 4th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'nina'.

nina

  • (v.) to be sweet-smelling, to be fragrant
  • (n.) fragrance (only pleasant)
  • (adj.) fragrant

Itilili heka! E nina!
“The air is sweet! And fragrant!”

Notes: A quote from one of my all time favorite movies. Today’s iku doesn’t look too bad for an ikunoala. I’m actually surprised I don’t use this word more.

Today I was having a discussion about terms for “smell” (in English). For me, to say something “smells” is almost always bad (unless it’s followed immediately by a “like” phrase), and the word “stink” is always bad. This isn’t the case, I guess, for a lot of people. For example, lots of people say that garlic “stinks”—people that eat garlic. To me, that’s like saying that a rose is flashy—or even that a rose stinks. The description just doesn’t make the slightest bit of sense. If something stinks, you do not eat it. PERIOD. Not only that, no one could possibly eat it. It’s not a matter of taste. Garlic has an aroma that carries and is distinctive, but so do jasmines. And if you say one stinks, then so does the other.

I swear, people be crazy!


Mike

• Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Glyph of the word 'mike'.

mike

  • (n.) albatross

Oloko Keli ti mike.
“Keli is dreaming of an albatross.”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!! :D

Here’s the picture:

Keli sound asleep.

What a big bushy tail she has!

Anyway, regarding this entry, here’s how I imagine the conversation will go in the future:

Person: So you had a Kamakawi Word of the Day blog?

Me: Yeah.

Person: And Kamakawi has a word for “albatross”?

Me: Yeah.

Person: And you had an entry that featured Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”?

Me: Yeah.

Person: So was that the entry for “albatross”?

Me: No.

Person:

Yeah. Oops. And now “albatross” is relegated to “afterthought” status. So it goes…


Latu

• Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

Glyph of the word 'latu'.

latu

  • (v.) to suck in (air or some other substance), to inhale
  • (n.) sucking in
  • (adj.) sucked up

Ka latu lea i levea lona ima!
“He drank too much salt water!”

Notes: This is a difficult word to describe to those who haven’t spent a lot of time looking at other natlangs without the conversation devolving into smut. Those who have (like most conlangers) know that a word like this is actually quite common in the world’s languages, and it isn’t always associated with sexual activity. In fact, there’s actually two words for this in Kamakawi: One that has to do specifically with air, and this one, which applies to everything else (but also includes air). If the Kamakawi had cigarettes, this is the verb they’d use.

As for the iku, it actually uses the box from tu (making this iku partly phonetic) and makes it into a mouth inside the boxish Kamakawi head you see in a lot of glyphs (e.g. huva, the opposite of this word). In this way it’s pretty solidly an iku’ui (I know there aren’t many, comparatively speaking).