Posts Tagged ‘actions’

Pe’a

• Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'pe'a'.

pe’a

  • (v.) to clothe
  • (adj.) clothed
  • (n.) top, shirt

Ea. A pe’a ei ie palaki oi’i.
“Yes. I clothe my dog.”

Notes: And why not? Dog clothes are adorable!

I had a really hard time keeping up with the blog this week, as I was filming for a program on CNN called The Next List. Was super, hyper, global, mega busy. Just trying my best to catch up now; not doing too well. (Also very busy with other stuff.)

Today’s word is used for the shirt tops introduced by Zhyler speakers. It was the old word for “clothing”, but pe’aka is the preferred term now. It does show the torso, as it was used in the olden days to refer to any kind of covering (usually worn to keep from getting wet, if one wanted to keep dry for some reason).


Puliu

• Monday, March 12th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'puliu'.

puliu

  • (v.) to salivate
  • (adj.) salivating
  • (n.) saliva, spit, spittle

A puliu palaki oi’ia i’i a!
“You’re dog’s slobbering on me!”

Notes: Today’s iku looks like a few others (e.g. huna), but somehow it means “salivate”. I think it’s the little line under the mouth… It kind of looks like that. Doesn’t it?

I remember creating a whole bunch of these “veiled face” iku (where “a whole bunch” could very well mean three). To me, they almost look too realistic for the system (which is odd, since they’re composed of straight lines and nothing more), but I’ve stuck with them. Might as well celebrate them, I guess.

Update: Oh! I just realized that the three lines above the mouth are there because they come from the iku for lelea, which means “water”. Ha! Kind of gross. ;)


Fate

• Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fate'.

fate

  • (n.) hole, gap
  • (v.) to put a hole in (something), to punch a hole
  • (adj.) full of holes
  • (n.) window

Ka lalau nea i amo poiu fate.
“She threw it out the window.”

Notes: Today’s iku featured in a word from a while back. If you go back and take a look at that entry, the etymology of the word should now be clear.

Fate’s glyph is a pretty simple ikunoala built off of te with a little fa on the inside.


Fukave

• Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fukave'.

fukave

  • (v.) to destroy (something inanimate)
  • (n.) destruction

I oloko ti’i, ae fukave iu lipo a…
“In my dream, I’m destroying boxes…”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!!!! :D

Keli loves to scratch up old boxes (and to bite on plastic, but she isn’t supposed to do that). Here she is all tuckered out:

Keli sleeping on Erin's lap.

Contained within today’s iku are the glyphs for fu, ka and fe. It’s a bit of a bonus that ka can double as the “bad” line determinative, and that it looks like an arrow pointing down. Unfortunately while this iku looks all right full size, in 12 pt, it looks like there’s a cartoonishly large arrow pointing downwards. Oh well.


Lu’a

• Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Glyph of the word 'lu'a'.

lu’a

  • (v.) to chant
  • (n.) chanting
  • (adj.) chanted

He lu’a ue ie eili kau.
“Let us chant the sun down.”

Notes: Today’s iku is a bit odd. Using the Kamakawi “head” glyph base, the syllabic glyph for ha is used as the mouth. This both gives a clue as to the pronunciation of the glyph, and also serves as a kind of evocative reminder of what the word means (the chant being a river that comes from the mouth).

On the Kamakawi islands, there’s an old tradition of going to the western edge of the island and chanting as the sun goes down. It’s not done every day—or even once a month—but on special occasions (weddings, births, funerals)—but even then, not all of them. Just certain ones. Someone will lead, but others can join in, with the chant leader setting the phrasal chanting patterns, and others joining in. I have a very specific idea for how this works, and could probably write about it, but that’ll have to wait for another day.


Kau

• Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

Glyph of the word 'kau'.

kau

  • (adv.) down, downwards
  • (adj.) down, lower
  • (v.) to go down, to go downwards, to descend

Lalau ia i amo kau!
“Throw it down!”

Notes: Following up on yesterday’s word, here is a very high-frequency Kamakawi word: kau. It kind of shows up everywhere. It can serve as the adverbial part of a number of compound verbs, as well as the elements listed above.

I was a bit surprised when typing up this iku to see that it resides in the ikunoala section of my font. Then I looked at it and said, “Oh.” And I do see what I was thinking; might not have made the same choice were I doing it now, but kau is so much a part of the script that there’s no changing it.

If you take a look at the iku for u, you’ll see that the “W”-looking glyph has three peaks, and that the peaks are connected. That’s basically what this is, except that the connecting line is on the bottom, and the three peaks are all ka. So the shape is purely phonological, and you can look at it and see how it’s pronounced, but its construction is not as straightforward as some of the other ikunoala.


Fili

• Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fili'.

fili

  • (v.) to put down, to let go of, to release, to let drop, to drop
  • (adj.) dropped
  • (adj.) dropping

Fili ia i ipe!
“Put that down!”

Notes: Today’s iku may look familiar. In fact, it’s a smallified (totally dig that word I just coinified) version of…wow. WOW. I seriously haven’t done kau yet?! And here I thought I was running out of iku

Well, take my word for it: The top part is a miniature version of kau, which means “down” or “downwards”. It has the familiar “ground” determinative beneath it to give the sense that something is moving towards the ground. And there you have the iku for fili. :) Up next some time: the iku for kau


Noka

• Saturday, February 18th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'noka'.

noka

  • (v.) to sigh
  • (n.) despair
  • (adj.) despairing

A kupi lea pe e noka kupae!
“He just sits there sighing!”

Notes: Today’s word is a simple ikunoala composed of no and ka. Of course, the ka could be doing double duty as the “bad” line determinative. I’ll neither confirm nor deny.


Oli

• Saturday, February 11th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'oli'.

oli

  • (n.) fruit
  • (v.) to pick (fruit, nuts, etc.), to harvest
  • (adj.) picked, harvested

Ai ipe i oli ai?
“Is that fruit?”

Notes: Fruit sounds good right now. I may have to go and harvest me some.

So this iku is a bit of a mystery. It doesn’t contain either o or li, and it doesn’t really look like an ikuiku. (What do you think? Does that look like a piece of fruit?) My first idea, on looking at it again, was that it kind of looked like a harvested field, but that doesn’t seem likely.

No, I think I may have intended this to be some sort of bizarre iconic representation of the category “fruit”. I’d say it looked like a coconut, but this is what a coconut looks like to the Kamakawi. Yes, I have to say that this one is a true mystery. We may never know what it’s supposed to represent…

Well, aside from the word oli.


Lama

• Friday, February 10th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'lama'.

lama

  • (v.) to make (refers to small things)
  • (n.) construction, making
  • (adj.) made, constructed, built, produced

Mata ei ka lama ia i…toyuku.
“I see that you’ve made…something.”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!! :D

Today’s Caturday is bittersweet, as I am, sadly, without cat. :( I’m off away in the wilds of New Mexico, while Keli is at home with Erin. Before I left, though, I constructed her a little wall of books:

Keli beyond the Wall.

I imagine she’ll stay there for the duration of my absence.

Today’s word, though, really doesn’t apply to something like a wall (and its use in the sentence above is deprecatory). It really applies to something like handicrafts or trinkets—something that you make that can fit in the palm of your hand. I’m still not sure whether it would apply to biscuits… I know this is probably the first thing you thought of (biscuits are usually the first thing I think of when I hear the word “hand”), but the more complex the food, the more likely you’d use lama with it (provided the end result is handheld).

I’ll be returning tomorrow, but if you happen to be in Albuquerque and are reading this, come out to the Hyatt Regency around dinner time. I’ll be giving a talk there and we’ll be screening Episode 6 from last season of Game of Thrones. The cost is $5, but all the money is going to the local branch of the American Cancer Society, which is pretty cool.

Be sure to pet a cat today! The cat will likely appreciate it. :)


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