Archive for the ‘Ikunoala’ Category

Puo

• Friday, March 9th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'puo'.

puo

  • (expr.) an answer to an unfair yes or no question (whether neither “yes” nor “no” is technically correct)
  • (n.) refusal

Puo.
“I refuse to answer the question.”

Notes: That, of course, is Keli’s answer to the question, “Are you still in our recycling box?” And she answers thus because it’s not a recycling box: It is a Kitty Fortress!

Keli in her new fortress.

She loves that box!

A word like puo is a useful word, because it allows one to answer questions like, “Are you still guilty?” Presuming you’ve never been guilty, an answer of “no” could mean, “No, I’m no longer guilty (but I once was)”, and answer of “yes” would, of course, be an admission of guilt. There’s not much you can do with that question in English. In Kamakawi, you can say puo.

The word was inspired by the Japanese word mu, which is used in the same way. I decided to go big tent with responses to questions in ol’ Kamakawi. Thus we have puo.


Fate

• Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fate'.

fate

  • (n.) hole, gap
  • (v.) to put a hole in (something), to punch a hole
  • (adj.) full of holes
  • (n.) window

Ka lalau nea i amo poiu fate.
“She threw it out the window.”

Notes: Today’s iku featured in a word from a while back. If you go back and take a look at that entry, the etymology of the word should now be clear.

Fate’s glyph is a pretty simple ikunoala built off of te with a little fa on the inside.


Loi

• Sunday, March 4th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'loi'. or Alternate glyph of the word 'to'.

loi

  • (n.) square
  • (adj.) square
  • (v.) to be square

Loi lipo.
“The box is square.”

Notes: Ha, ha! You can say a box is “square” as opposed to “rectangular”; you don’t need to say “cubical”. ;) (Referring to an old debate.)

Loi is one of those words that can be spelled in different ways depending on who’s doing it. The first iku is a combination of lo and oi. The second is simply a square with the “identity” determinative beneath it. The iku does enjoy use elsewhere, but it’s pretty clear when it means “square” and when it means “to quadruple”, I think.


Foe

• Saturday, March 3rd, 2012

Glyph of the word 'foe'.

foe

  • (adj.) next (to), adjacent
  • (v.) to be next to
  • (prep.) next to
  • (n.) the area next to

He foe ei i ia!
“Let me get next to you!”

Notes: Well, actually that’d properly be foemu, but I’ve committed to using the word as it is in the entry title, so I fudged. This is a shortening of the line from the famous Itchy & Scratchy episode “Itchy & Scratchy Meet Fritz the Cat”. Heh, heh…

So I never do this anymore (or try not to, anyway), but I saw the iku for foe and absolutely had to change it. See, foe is a simple ikunoala—a combination of fo and oe—and the latter is built off of the iku for ta, just like the iku for me is. We saw a combination of fo and me just the other day, so by all rights, this iku should look just the same, the only difference being the line. Instead, the iku looked like this:

Now, it’s fine if that’s just how one happens to draw the iku one time. But a regularized font is supposed to present certain shapes in the same style so you can recognize that it’s a unified font—otherwise what you end up with is a ransom note. Given the combinations present in foe and fome, there’s absolutely no reason the basic shapes (specifically the tails at the bottom) should look so different. So I had to redo it.

And so you get the image at the top. Takes about the same amount of time to edit one character in the font as it does twenty, so it feels like a waste of time, but, darn it, it was worth it! I can sleep easy tonight.


Fukave

• Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fukave'.

fukave

  • (v.) to destroy (something inanimate)
  • (n.) destruction

I oloko ti’i, ae fukave iu lipo a…
“In my dream, I’m destroying boxes…”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!!!! :D

Keli loves to scratch up old boxes (and to bite on plastic, but she isn’t supposed to do that). Here she is all tuckered out:

Keli sleeping on Erin's lap.

Contained within today’s iku are the glyphs for fu, ka and fe. It’s a bit of a bonus that ka can double as the “bad” line determinative, and that it looks like an arrow pointing down. Unfortunately while this iku looks all right full size, in 12 pt, it looks like there’s a cartoonishly large arrow pointing downwards. Oh well.


Fome

• Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fome'.

fome

  • (adj.) short
  • (v.) to be short
  • (n.) short person

Fome ei lona!
“I’m too short!”

Notes: But, in truth, I’ve come to accept the height I am. After all, it’s not that bad.

Today’s iku is a combination of fo and me. That’s why the fo shape has that little line above it: it’s the line from me.


Fape

• Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fape'.

fape

  • (adj.) smooth
  • (n.) smoothness
  • (v.) to be smooth

Ale fape ia ima!
“Because you’re so smooth!”

Notes: Heh, heh. From that Santana song that came out a few years back. Of course, the Kamakawi word implies “smooth to the touch”, not “smooth” as in “smooth operator”.

To me it’s clear that there should be different words for this and for gentle (yesterday’s word). There’s also a third idea that I think also deserves its own word, and it’s something like “sleek”. What it means is both smooth and wet. My ideal for this concept is a dolphin’s skin (in the water). Provided it doesn’t make that awful rubbery sound like a balloon, a dolphin’s skin (while wet) is the ideal surface, and it’d be nice if everything in the world was like that. As it is, we have to deal with all these horrible rough surfaces. Just…awful…


Fene

• Monday, February 27th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fene'.

fene

  • (adj.) brief
  • (n.) brevity
  • (v.) to be brief

A fene hala’i.
“Life is short.”

Notes: Brevity seems like a concept central to human experience, as it defines just about everything we can experience. For that reason I decided to make it a basic term in Kamakawi. It might seem a little bizarre to have it be a central concept (specifically brevity as it relates to time), but that’s why this is an artlang.


Fupu

• Sunday, February 26th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'fupu'.

fupu

  • (n.) spider

A ile ei iu fupu.
“I hate spiders.”

Notes: Bleh. I do. I hate them. I hate them and I fear them—and they disgust me! It’s pretty much the worst thing in the world, me and spiders. I gave them what I thought was the stupidest-sounding word in the world (fupu) in order to try to sap their strength. It didn’t work. They still have the power to utterly destroy me.

It’s too bad the iku actually ended up looking pretty all right… I mean it’s not bad.

Blech. Oh well. Lousy spiders…


Utaka

• Saturday, February 25th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'utaka'.

utaka

  • (adj.) ordinary, common, commonplace, usual
  • (n.) a plant or animal that is common to a particular region (not necessarily native/indigenous)
  • (v.) to be common, to be ordinary, to be usual
  • (v.) to cover, to be all over (something)

Au utaka katava i Kalivónia Eiliki.
“Palm trees are ubiquitous to Southern California.”

Notes: Though you wouldn’t know it by looking outside today (which is, actually, two days in the future from the date it says on this post). Raining like a rain parade outside! It’ll happen in the winter, of course, but this one came out of nowhere. It’s been hot here! Like a mini summer!

This is one of those iku that I’m not particularly proud of. The “W” shape of the u is truncated, and the whole thing looks a bit haphazard. Clearly this iku was built because I wanted more with ta in them (because that one’s one of my favorites), but it didn’t come off so naturally. Oh well. It’s here to stay!


This page was last modified on October 28, 2013.
This website was last modified on .
This page can be viewed normally, as a milk or dark chocolate bar, in sleek black and white, or in many other ways!
All languages, fonts, pictures, and other materials copyright © 2003- David J. Peterson.

free counters