Archive for the ‘P’ Category

Pe’a

• Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'pe'a'.

pe’a

  • (v.) to clothe
  • (adj.) clothed
  • (n.) top, shirt

Ea. A pe’a ei ie palaki oi’i.
“Yes. I clothe my dog.”

Notes: And why not? Dog clothes are adorable!

I had a really hard time keeping up with the blog this week, as I was filming for a program on CNN called The Next List. Was super, hyper, global, mega busy. Just trying my best to catch up now; not doing too well. (Also very busy with other stuff.)

Today’s word is used for the shirt tops introduced by Zhyler speakers. It was the old word for “clothing”, but pe’aka is the preferred term now. It does show the torso, as it was used in the olden days to refer to any kind of covering (usually worn to keep from getting wet, if one wanted to keep dry for some reason).


Puliu

• Monday, March 12th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'puliu'.

puliu

  • (v.) to salivate
  • (adj.) salivating
  • (n.) saliva, spit, spittle

A puliu palaki oi’ia i’i a!
“You’re dog’s slobbering on me!”

Notes: Today’s iku looks like a few others (e.g. huna), but somehow it means “salivate”. I think it’s the little line under the mouth… It kind of looks like that. Doesn’t it?

I remember creating a whole bunch of these “veiled face” iku (where “a whole bunch” could very well mean three). To me, they almost look too realistic for the system (which is odd, since they’re composed of straight lines and nothing more), but I’ve stuck with them. Might as well celebrate them, I guess.

Update: Oh! I just realized that the three lines above the mouth are there because they come from the iku for lelea, which means “water”. Ha! Kind of gross. ;)


Puo

• Friday, March 9th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'puo'.

puo

  • (expr.) an answer to an unfair yes or no question (whether neither “yes” nor “no” is technically correct)
  • (n.) refusal

Puo.
“I refuse to answer the question.”

Notes: That, of course, is Keli’s answer to the question, “Are you still in our recycling box?” And she answers thus because it’s not a recycling box: It is a Kitty Fortress!

Keli in her new fortress.

She loves that box!

A word like puo is a useful word, because it allows one to answer questions like, “Are you still guilty?” Presuming you’ve never been guilty, an answer of “no” could mean, “No, I’m no longer guilty (but I once was)”, and answer of “yes” would, of course, be an admission of guilt. There’s not much you can do with that question in English. In Kamakawi, you can say puo.

The word was inspired by the Japanese word mu, which is used in the same way. I decided to go big tent with responses to questions in ol’ Kamakawi. Thus we have puo.


Payu

• Friday, January 27th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'payu'.

payu

  • (v.) to show, to display to
  • (n.) displaying, showing

Ai fulele ia ae mata ie palei li’i ai? Ale ko! He male payu ei i ia!
“You want to see my home? Come on in! I’ll show it to you!”

Notes: For a present, we got something in a brown paper bag. We set it on the ground, and Keli had found a new little home:

Keli hunkering down in a bag.

I suspected she would exit the bag if I approached her, so I took out my camera and started taking pictures from a distance, and continued to do so as I edged closer. This was the best of the bunch (since, indeed, she did exit the bag when I got closer).

Today’s word is built off the iku for moko (“eight”), but in this case, it’s actually serving the function of an ikunoala. See, the glyph for pa is an upside-down triangle, and the glyph for iu is a right-side-up triangle. By setting one above the other, you get payu. Of course, it couldn’t be identical to moko, so to disambiguate the pair, a notch was added to the top.


Pela

• Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'pela'.

pela

  • (n.) sibling

Ipe ioku pela oi’i!
“That is not my sibling!”

Notes: Today’s word means “sibling” in the technical sense. It’s just a basic word, but it feels much more formal, nowadays. As a result it’s generally only used when one sibling is mad at the other (e.g. “He may be my sibling, but he is not my brother!”). The iku is built off of pe, and it has the little la spearhead coming off of the little stick down at the top.


Pa’a

• Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'pa'a'.

pa’a

  • (n.) mallet, hammer, club
  • (n.) drumstick, mallet for a large drum or gong

Li ia i ipe pa’a ko.
“Bring that hammer here.”

Notes: I gots a little smashing to do.

After designing this iku, I thought, “Naaah! Too simple!” But I went with it, and it’s stuck. And it is a good design, in principle; it’s not inconceivable that another culture would come up with it. Seems useful for those great big drums—and also for cracking open crabs and mussels and other shellfish.


Powi

• Sunday, January 8th, 2012

Glyph of the word 'powi'.

powi

  • (n.) music

Oku hala’i ei io powi tou oku.
“I can’t live without music.”

Notes: The Kamakawi word for “music” is an homage to the greatest musician of the 20th century: David Bowie. (That’s right: I’m saying it! If anyone comments, “But what about Elvis?”, so help me…)

The iku for “music” gives a clue as to the real derivation of the word—that is, it’s onomatopoeic. The concept derives from drumming, as the beat is the backbone of all music. I kind of think of it as the spine, and the rest of the instrumentation branches off from the spine (and from those bones the muscles, the tissue, etc.).

Oh, and by the way, today is David Bowie’s birthday. He’s now 65, which means that 66 is the new old: if you’re 65 or younger, you’re now young. And so it shall go from here on out! :D


Poyouyou

• Friday, December 23rd, 2011

Glyph of the word 'poyouyou'.

poyouyou

  • (v.) to dangle

Mata ia i’i! Ae poyouyou i ipe otu mataitai i’i.
“Look at me! I’m dangling this pretty paw for you.”

Notes: HAPPY CATURDAY!!! :D

I’ve got a couple of shots of Keli in this new pose she likes: three legs in, one stretched far away. It’s pretty cute:

Keli dangling an arm.

I think she knows how good she looks. “Regard ye this paw!” she says. “Regard it and resist me not!”

[Note: To see the word this derives from, look up poyou.]


Poli

• Monday, December 5th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'poli'.

poli

  • (v.) to soak something in water (or let something soak in water [by default])
  • (adj.) soaked
  • (adj.) soaking

Poli ia ie pe’aka.
“Soak the clothing in water.”

Notes: This seemed like a pretty good basic term for an island people. Poli is one of the few formants whose adjectival versions are both “passive” and “active” (i.e. you can use it describe something that has been soaked in water and something that is currently soaking in water). Otherwise, this is a pretty plain-jane word, and a pretty plain-jane iku. Every language needs them, I suppose.


Paketepi

• Sunday, December 4th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'paketepi'.

paketepi

  • (n.) anthill

Oku olomo pe! Ipe i paketepi!
“Don’t step there! That’s an anthill!”

Notes: Since we recently had a word for ant, I thought I’d put up “anthill”. Works pretty much the same as English, except that rather than “hill” it’s pake, the word for “mountain”. This isn’t my favorite Kamakawi word for “anthill”, but it kind of reminded me of the song “Worm Mountain” by the Flaming Lips (easily one of my favorite songs off their album Embryonic), so I threw it up today.

In other news, I’m probably going to win my fantasy football matchup today, but probably not going to make the playoffs (even though the leader in one division is sub-.500). Lot of bad, bad luck this year and bad matchups. One can one do?


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