Tag Archives: Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita
Vladimir Nabokov

Let’s get the bad stuff out of the way first. Yes, Lolita is a novel about child exploitation. That’s one of the reasons why I vowed I’d never read it, or anything else by Nabokov—and I probably never would have, had it not been assigned by my first English professor in my first English class at Berkeley

The Defense
Vladimir Nabokov

Yet another of Nabokov’s Russian novels, The Defense (also known as The Luzhin Defense, or Zashchita Luzhina) is rather delightfully surprising…

Invitation to a Beheading
Vladimir Nabokov

Invitation to a Beheading, in my opinion, is the best of Nabokov’s Russian novels. I can say that confidently, even though I haven’t read all his Russian novels…

Despair
Vladimir Nabokov

Despair is about a depressed man who happens upon his own look-alike: a homeless man lying in the side of the road sleeping. As a way of getting a fresh start, he concocts a plan to murder his double, whom, he believes, everyone will mistake for himself, thereby freeing him from all his obligations (job, marriage, etc.)…

Glory
Vladimir Nabokov

Glory is a novel for fans of Fitzgerald and possibly Salinger, but it’s not one of Nabokov’s masterpieces…