Tag Archives: Translation

El Conde Lucanor
Don Juan Manuel

As a collection of stories, El Conde Lucanor was bound to have some highlights and some lowlights, but the low outnumber the high, and the high aren’t as high as a reader would hope…

The Divine Comedy
Dante Alighieri

Given the magnificent structure of the work, and the quality of the poetry in Italian, I have to wonder if it’s worthwhile to read The Divine Comedy in translation…

Moominvalley in November
Tove Jansson

Tove Jansson, the dreary Finn, is at it again for one last time. Moominvalley in November is the last of the Moomin books (which is a shame), and it reads more like a suicide note than a children’s book…

Orlando Furioso
Ludovico Ariosto

Without a doubt, Orlando Furioso is one of the most enjoyable books I’ve ever read. From start to finish, it’s all action, and all awesome…

The Song of Roland
Anonymous

Now, don’t get me wrong. The Song of Roland is incredibly stupid. I just think the abuse it receives is undeserved…

Journey to the West
Wu Cheng'en

The impact that Journey to the West has had on the world since its publication is…staggering. I don’t think I would be overstating things to say that most (if not all) modern manga/anime have been directly influenced by Journey to the West

The Theogony
Hesiod

If The Theogony has any real value today, it’s as a reference work. If ever you find yourself wondering who Hephaestus’s parents are, or if he has any brothers or sisters, this is the place to go…

Forest of a Thousand Daemons
Daniel Olorunfemi Fagunwa

I would dearly love to give Fagunwa’s Forest of a Thousand Daemons an A+, but the nature of the story simply will not allow it…

The Double
Fyodor Dostoevsky

There are many things I’m tempted to say about Dostoevsky’s novel(la?) The Double: A Petersburg Poem, and all of them are false…

The Magic Mountain
Thomas Mann

The Magic Mountain, much like Oblomov, is a dangerous book. What Mann does with this novel of little action that moves at a snail’s place is illustrate just how easily one’s life, one’s youth, one’s livelihood can slowly but surely slip away…